The events surrounding the violent student uprising in mexico during the olympics

Olympic Games Mexico City Controversy in Latin America Source: After evaluating everything, Mexico City won 30 of the 58 votes while Detroit received 14, Lyon 12 and Buenos Aires 2. However, the international sporting event took place for a third time in autumn, from October 12 to 27, instead of traditionally in the summer mainly due to the city being affected by the rainy season between the start of May and the start of October.

The events surrounding the violent student uprising in mexico during the olympics

Opponent, Opponent Responses, and Violence Opponents: The government held counter-demonstrations in an attempt to undermine the support for the student campaign.

Students threw rocks and sometimes Molotov cocktails when the military attempted to take over the National Polytechnic Institute. There may have been other instances of similar violence during the nonviolent campaign, but they are not known.

The nonviolent campaign grew out of clashes between students and police forces in late July Repressive Violence: Police often attacked demonstrators, firing live ammunition, arresting leaders and demonstrators, and beating others.

The most notable instance of repressive violence was the orchestrated massacre of maybe more demonstrators and the arrest of 1, more during an assembly on October 2 in the plaza at Tlatelolco. This action effectively slowed the campaign, which essentially ended after that day and the Olympic games in mid-October.

None of the stated goals seemed to have been achieved, despite the shift in mindset of the average Mexican citizen as a result of the campaign. The CNH and the brigades fell apart soon after the October 2 massacre.

Despite the failure of the campaign, it grew hugely from it's start in late July and early August. An August 27 rally reachedparticipants and many parents and workers joined the campaign begun initially by students.

In July ofas the student-led uprising of May and June in France was fading away, a new one was just beginning in Mexico City. Students inspired by the success of the movement in France saw their own opportunity to bring more open democracy to Mexico.

The dissent that had been simmering previously was finally triggered on July 22nd when a street fight between rival high school students was brutally repressed by police, causing students from both factions to barricade themselves within a school.

After several days of rioting and fights between police and students, high school and university students initiated student strikes and occupations of school buildings in order to protest the police repression.

Each protest caused more anger among students as they were met with more police brutality. After the July 30th repression, the student demonstrators became more organized in their protests and the result seemed to be a diminishment in the level of violence on their part.

Finally, at a protest on August 5th, organizers circulated a petition with a list of demands. It asked for the release of political prisoners, the disbanding of the granaderos government police forcethe dismissal of the police chief General Cueto and his assistant General Mendiola, compensation for acts of police brutality that initiated protests, the repeal of Article and A of the consitution, and punishment of guilty members within the police and government.

These specific demands were part of a larger demand for a more open and democratic government. These brigades were small groups of students who produced their own fliers, often with different demands from other brigades and the CNH, and staged their own lightening protests.

In these lightening protests students would quickly organize and then disband before police arrived. They also performed street theatre with political themes, staged political conversations in public spaces, made speeches in social gathering spaces such as squares or markets, and painted slogans on walls and telephone poles.

Mexican students protest for greater democracy, | Global Nonviolent Action Database

Betweenandpeople participated in the first march and reclaimed the square, which had previously been used for PRI demonstrations. Overpeople participated in the second march. As part of these two actions in August parents, workers, teachers, and nurses joined the students in their demands for greater democracy in Mexico.

Throughout the campaign the PRI government also attempted to undermine the student protests by arranging demonstrations of their own. One such demonstration on August 28th revealed the extent to which the government had lost public support.

Instead, the silence was broken by some protesting university students, who chanted as they marched directly into the midst of the governmental rally. The gathered crowd cheered on the students, only to be dispersed by armed police forces when the students had reached the front of the Presidential Palace.

Nonetheless, the CNH and the smaller brigades continued their organizing and distribution of leaflets. On September 13th the students held a silent march and on September 15th they organized a fair on the UNAM campus, which had become a center for pro-democracy protests.

When the military attempted to take over the National Polytechnic Institute, another center for dissent, students and residents in the area retaliated with stones and Molotov cocktails, leading to three days of clashes between students and military troops.

However, this attempted suppression of the campaign did not stop the protests, as students simply began circulating fliers explaining yet another act of government repression.

However, as the October 12th date for the beginning of the Olympic games approached, the PRI became increasingly anxious to suppress the civil unrest. October 2nd was the tragic day that marked a turning point in the campaign. On that day, in the plaza of the housing project, Tlatelolco, between 5, and 15, people gathered peacefully to protest and listen to speakers.

Suddenly, soon after the speeches had begun, special military units began firing on the crowd. Hundreds of peaceful protesters, as well as residents living in the buildings surrounding the plaza, were killed and 1, more were arrested by police and military troops.

The horrific scene was represented in government-controlled newspapers as a violent student uprising which forced military action throughout the city. Protests continued after October 2nd, but the CNH agreed to a truce beginning on October 9th in preparation for the Olympic games.

After the Olympics there was little more protest action. In December, the CNH was dissolved and students returned to their schools, ending the student strikes. The dissolution of the movement after the brutal crackdown at Tlatelolco is a marked contrast from the effect that police repression had on the student campaign in France.Student riots threaten Mexico Olympics More than 25 people have been killed during a vicious gun battle in Mexico City just days before the Olympic Games are due to begin.

Thousands of students had gathered for a meeting organised by the National Strike Council in La Plaza de las Tres Culturas in Tlatelolco to protest against the military.

The events surrounding the violent student uprising in mexico during the olympics

Dec 01,  · On Aug. 27, , students in Mexico City staged a protest in the Zocalo plaza. It was one of the largest protests against the government in Mexico's history. The Summer Olympics (Spanish: Juegos Olímpicos de Verano de ), officially known as the Games of the XIX Olympiad, was an international multi-sport event held in Mexico City, Mexico, from October 12 to 27, These were the first Olympic Games to be staged in Latin America and the first to be staged in a Spanish-speaking country.

Student riots threaten Mexico Olympics More than 25 people have been killed during a vicious gun battle in Mexico City just days before the Olympic Games are due to begin. Thousands of students had gathered for a meeting organised by the National Strike Council in La Plaza de las Tres Culturas in Tlatelolco to protest against the military occupation of the National Polytechnic Institute.

The bloody crackdown on Oct. 2, only days before the Mexico City Olympics where U.S. Black athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos flashed the Black Power salute, ushered in another period of. In July of , as the student-led uprising of May and June in France was fading away, a new one was just beginning in Mexico City.

Students inspired by the success of the movement in France saw their own opportunity to bring more open democracy to Mexico.

Summer Olympics - Wikipedia