Examples of inductive and deductive research

Z Deductive and Inductive Arguments When assessing the quality of an argumentwe ask how well its premises support its conclusion.

Examples of inductive and deductive research

A deductive approach usually begins with a hypothesis, whilst an inductive approach will usually use research questions to narrow the scope of the study. For deductive approaches the emphasis is generally on causality, whilst for inductive approaches the aim is usually focused on exploring new phenomena or looking at previously researched phenomena from a different perspective.

Inductive approaches are generally associated with qualitative research, whilst deductive approaches are more commonly associated with quantitative research. However, there are no set rules and some qualitative studies may have a deductive orientation.

One specific inductive approach that is frequently referred to in research literature is grounded theory, pioneered by Glaser and Strauss. This approach necessitates the researcher beginning with a completely open mind without any preconceived ideas of what will be found.

Deductive Approaches and Some Examples

The aim is to generate a new theory based on the data. Once the data analysis has been completed the researcher must examine existing theories in order to position their new theory within the discipline. Grounded theory is not an approach to be used lightly. It requires extensive and repeated sifting through the data and analysing and re-analysing multiple times in order to identify new theory.

It is an approach best suited to research projects where there the phenomena to be investigated has not been previously explored. The most important point to bear in mind when considering whether to use an inductive or deductive approach is firstly the purpose of your research; and secondly the methods that are best suited to either test a hypothesis, explore a new or emerging area within the discipline, or to answer specific research questions.

Inductive and deductive approaches to research – Dr Deborah Gabriel

Has this post helped you? If so then please leave a comment!Deductive and Inductive Arguments. When assessing the quality of an argument, we ask how well its premises support its srmvision.com specifically, we ask whether the argument is either deductively valid or inductively strong..

A deductive argument is an argument that is intended by the arguer to be deductively valid, that is, to provide a .

Examples of inductive and deductive research

There are varying degrees of strength and weakness in inductive reasoning, and various types including statistical syllogism, arguments from example, causal inferences, simple inductions, and inductive generalizations. They can have part to whole relations, extrapolations, or predictions.

Now you.

Social Research Methods - Knowledge Base - Deduction & Induction

Understanding Inductive Reasoning. There are varying degrees of strength and weakness in inductive reasoning, and various types including statistical syllogism, arguments from example, causal inferences, simple inductions, and inductive generalizations.

They can . In the study of logical reasoning, arguments can be separated into two categories: deductive and inductive. Deductive reasoning is sometimes described as a "top-down" form of logic, while inductive reasoning is considered "bottom-up." The essence of the argument, mathematically, is: If A = B, and B.

Describe the inductive approach to research, and provide examples of inductive research. Describe the deductive approach to research, and provide examples of deductive research.

Examples of inductive and deductive research

Describe the ways that inductive and deductive approaches may be complementary. The main difference between inductive and deductive approaches to research is that whilst a deductive approach is aimed and testing theory, an inductive approach is concerned with the generation of new theory emerging from the data.

Inductive or Deductive? Two Different Approaches